wordmark


Mission
Visitor Information
Contact us


Current
Online
Travelling
Past


Why Teach the Holocaust
Book a Tour
School Programs
Teaching Resources
Online & Multimedia
Outreach Speakers
Professional Development
Teacher Mailing List


Upcoming
Commemorative


Library & Collection

Bookstore
Survivor Testimonies


Annual Reports
Zachor Newsletter
Wosk Publishing

support us
Donations
Membership
Tribute Cards
Volunteer


Donate Now Through CanadaHelps.org!

image image




 


image

50 - 950 West 41st Ave,
Vancouver BC, V5Z 2N7 Canada

P: 604.264.0499
F: 604.264.0497
E: info@vhec.org

  image
travelling
 

image

Alfred Bader’s internment shirt from Camp I (Île-aux-Noix, Quebec), circa 1940-1941.
– Courtesy Alfred Bader
© Photo by Jessica Bushey


image © Photo by Barb Choit

"Enemy Aliens": The Internment of Jewish Refugees in Canada, 1940-1943

The VHEC's acclaimed travelling exhibit explores a little-known story of Canada's wartime internment of nearly 2,300 Jewish refugees. During the Second World War, Canada’s discriminatory immigration policies denied entry to those seeking refuge from Nazi Germany, especially Jews. Young men, mostly between the ages of 16 and 20, had found asylum in Britain only to be arrested and interned under suspicion of being spies. In 1940, Canada agreed to Britain’s request to aid the war effort by taking in these prisoners of war or “enemy aliens”. Through testimony and artefacts, this exhibit highlights a little-known chapter of Canadian history. The refugees’ journey from fascist Europe to refuge in England, imprisonment in Britain and Canada and their eventual release is a bittersweet tale of survival during the Holocaust. The bilingual travelling exhibit features multimedia elements, as well as school program and teaching material.

Read more
Exhibit specs & booking info

 
image

image

More than just games:
canada & the 1936 olympics

The 1936 Olympics were held in Nazi Germany at a critical juncture between the building of the racial state and the Holocaust. The world faced a decision about whether to participate in these controversial Games. Canadian athletes, particularly young Jewish athletes, were caught in a dilemma. Should they follow their dreams to the world’s greatest athletic competition or should they boycott the 1936 Olympics?

Read more
Exhibit specs & booking info


Framing Bodies:
Sport & Spectacle in Nazi Germany

FRAMING BODIES: Sport and Spectacle in Nazi Germany explores the relationship between athletics, politics and visual culture during the 1936 Games.

Read more
Exhibit specs & booking info

 
image

nuremberg:
Justice in the aftermath of the holocaust

Over 60 years after the Allies established the International Military Tribunal to try Nazi leaders for their roles in the systematic murder of millions of people during the Holocaust and Second World War, the Nuremberg trials stand as a watershed moment in the ongoing pursuit of international justice. The United Nations’ declarations on genocide and human rights, Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the International Criminal Court at the Hague all reflect principles established at Nuremberg. The Nuremberg exhibit traces the history of the trials, highlighting their accomplishments, controversies and legacies, and considers human rights issues that demand response and resolve from the international community today.

Read more
Exhibit specs & booking info

 
image

Vancouver's Schindler Jews

Vancouver's Schindler Jews presents the story of Oskar Schindler who rescued over 1000 Jews during the Holocaust, through the unique perspective of four Schindlerjuden who later immigrated to Canada and found new lives in Vancouver. The exhibit is based on the personal narratives, documents, photographs and artefacts of the four Schindler survivors - Else Dunner, Bernard Goldberg and Esther and Leon Kaufman - ensuring that their unique voices will not be lost.

Read more
Exhibit specs & booking info

 
image

Janus Korczak and the Children
of the Warsaw Ghetto

Janusz Korczak was one of the world’s first advocates of children’s rights. On August 6, 1942 he became a heroic figure. On that day, this Polish-Jewish doctor, writer and educator was forced to gather together the two hundred orphans under his care in the Warsaw Ghetto and report for deportation. Refusing all offers for his own rescue, he led them with quiet dignity to the tram that would take them to the Treblinka extermination camp, where he perished with them.

Read more
Exhibit specs & booking info

 
image

Ravensbruck:
Forgotten Women of the Holocaust

The Ravensbrück women’s camp was located near Berlin. The only Nazi concentration camp built specifically for women, it was a centre for the economic exploitation of female prisoners – a profit making enterprise with the goals of re-education, work, and extermination. In the six years that Ravensbrück existed 132,000 women and children passed through its gates. 117,000 perished, the highest mortality rate of any concentration camp on German soil.

Read more
Exhibit specs & booking info

 
image

Life Unworthy of Life:
Nazi Euthanasia Crimes at Hadamar

Life Unworthy of Life tells the disturbing story of the Hadamar Institution, a Nazi ‘euthanasia’ killing centre in Germany. By 1941 more than 10,000 men, women and children were murdered at Hadamar as a direct result of Nazi racial policies. The primary victims of the Nazi ‘euthanasia’ and forced sterilization program were German children and adults who were blind, deaf, physically disabled or mentally handicapped, epileptics, orphans, juvenile delinquents and nonconformist youth.

Read more
Exhibit specs & booking info

 
image

Shanghai: A Refuge During the Holocaust

Shanghai: A Refuge During the Holocaust chronicles the little-known story of the thousands of Jews who sought and found refuge in wartime Shanghai. Based on the oral histories of Shanghai-landers now living in Vancouver, the exhibit tells their stories through the use of documents and photographs. Shanghai: A Refuge During the Holocaust presents the compelling history of this special sanctuary and of those who survived through resolve, adaptability and resourcefulness.

Read more
Exhibit specs & booking info

 
open hearts

Open Hearts Closed Doors

Open Hearts – Closed Doors tells the story of the arrival, on Canadian soil between 1947-49, of 1123 Jewish children orphaned by the Holocaust. The exhibit, produced by the VHEC, chronicles the lives of these children as they emerged from the Holocaust.

Read more
Exhibit specs & booking info

 
 

top of the page