WHY LEARN ABOUT THE HOLOCAUST?

“Education holds the key to fostering the spirit of tolerance. The true way of living is found in being compassionate, learning from each other’s differences, accepting the individuality of those around us and creating a harmonious co-existence.”

– Jack Kowarsky, Vancouver Holocaust survivor

“All we know and learn from the Holocaust strengthens us, as we may confront other genocides elsewhere or in the making.”

– Tom Szekely, Vancouver Holocaust survivor

Holocaust Education

By fostering critical thinking, the Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre connects the Holocaust with Canadian history as well as contemporary social justice issues.

When studying the Holocaust, learners are engaging with complicated moral questions, many of which do not come with simple answers. Education about the Shoah encourages us to reflect on how individuals could or should act in society.

While the Holocaust provides important lessons from the past to learn for the present and the future, it significantly brings to the forefront human rights and social justice issues.

Benefits of Holocaust Education

Learning about the Holocaust:

  • Encourages students to promote social justice, human rights and genocide awareness.
  • Supports the effective examination of basic moral issues.
  • Provides reflections on the dangers of remaining silent, apathetic, and indifferent to the oppression of others.
  • Helps learners to identify danger signals and to know when to take constructive actions.
  • Supports students in understanding the roots and ramifications of prejudice, racism, and stereotyping in any society.
  • Provides understanding about the responsibility of citizens in any society.
  • Has the potential to encourage young people to think about how to make a positive impact through individual and group actions.
  • Gives learners the opportunity to develop an awareness of the value of diversity in a pluralistic society.
  • Encourages sensitivity to the positions of minorities.
  • Helps students to develop an expanded view of humanity.